Proposed changes in 11th edition of global diagnostic tool can affect identification of PTSD, cautions study

Proposed changes in 11th edition of global diagnostic tool can affect identification of PTSD, cautions study

On evaluating the revisions introduced in the upcoming 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), a study led by the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine has identified that the proposed changes are against the interest of patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). According to the study, the revisions, if implemented, would lead to a decline in the number of individuals coming under the ambit of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As a result, the reduction in diagnosis of moderate or early stage PTSD may reduce by up to 57 per cent. Continue reading

Google aims to curb tech addiction with ‘Digital Wellbeing’

Google aims to curb tech addiction with ‘Digital Wellbeing’

Internet behemoth Google recently announced a slew of features intended toward the well-being of its users. Dubbed as “Digital Wellbeing,” the initiative is a collection of apps and features that the company claims will enable users to make productive use of their time while on Android devices. According to the tech giant, the new features would permit users to keep a track of the time spent on social media, block distracting notifications and reduce the vibrancy of the screen during bedtime that would ultimately help in reining in tech addiction. Continue reading

Scientists develop genetic test to help patients receive right anti-depression medication faster

Scientists develop genetic test to help patients receive right anti-depression medication faster

Finding the right treatment plan for various mental illnesses, especially depression is a big challenge. Experts feel that finding the right medicine for depressive disorder is mostly a trial-and-error process. In a bid to make the depression treatment more efficient and precise, scientists recently developed a genetic testing protocol that can help determine the accurate treatment/medicine for a patient at a faster pace. Continue reading

Kent State University receives $2.7 million to study effect of traumatic injuries on depression, anxiety, PTSD and bipolar

Kent State University receives $2.7 million to study effect of traumatic injuries on depression, anxiety, PTSD and bipolar

To study the effect of traumatic injuries on psychiatric health, the Kent State University, Ohio, recently received $2.7 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to gain a better understanding of factors that fuels the onset of depression and other affective disorders like anxiety, bipolar disorder and PTSD. Continue reading

Children growing up in cities without pets more likely to develop mental illness, says study

Children growing up in cities without pets more likely to develop mental illness, says study

People who live in the countryside with pets are more resilient to stress and mental health problems compared to people who lead a pet-free life in cities, suggests a recent study by researchers from the University of Ulm in Germany and the University of Colorado (CU) Boulder. The researchers attributed the overall well-being of countryside people to their efficient immune systems due to the exposure to animals and bacteria-laden dust. Continue reading

Raw fruit and vegetable intake good for mental health, says study

Raw fruit and vegetable intake good for mental health, says study

A healthy and nutritious diet, including raw fruits and vegetables, is known to prevent various physical ailments, but one may wonder whether it can also benefit one’s mental health. Now, a recent research by the Department of Psychology in University of Otago, New Zealand, puts all such doubts to rest and says that consuming raw fruits and vegetables can help improve one’s mental health and provide relief from the symptoms of an existing mental illness. Continue reading

Driver with history of mental illness kills 10 in Canada

Driver with history of mental illness kills 10 in Canada

The gruesome killing of 10 innocent people in broad daylight has sent the Toronto city in a state of shock and grief. Alek Minassian, a 25-year-old student at Toronto’s Seneca College, killed 10 people and injured 15 others after driving his rental van into a crowd of pedestrians at Yonge Street, north of downtown Toronto, on April 23, 2018. Out of those injured, four are reported to be critical. Though the motive of the incident remains unknown, Minassian has been identified as someone with a history of mental illness. The police is investigating the matter further. Continue reading

Bill seeks amendment to Act related to advertisements on mental health rehabs

Bill seeks amendment to Act related to advertisements on mental health rehabs

Feeling the need to regulate the advertisements on the internet regarding mental health rehabs, Illinois recently suggested certain amendments to the House Bill (HB) 4949  – Consumer Fraud and Deceptive Business Practices Act – to the Mental Health Committee for review. After a short debate on Apr 20, 2018, the committee recommended these to be adopted. As per the proposed changes, it would be illegal for an individual to publish any misleading or false adverts. Further, no individual can indulge in any sort of promotion that misrepresents the need to look for help for mental health issues or treatment for substance use disorder outside the state of Illinois. Continue reading

Suspect involved in Tennessee Waffle House shootout has mental health issues

Suspect involved in Tennessee Waffle House shootout has mental health issues

A barely clothed man, wearing nothing but a green jacket, approached Waffle House restaurant in Antioch on Sunday and used an AR-15-style semi-automatic rifle to kill two people outside the restaurant. He then went inside the building and continued firing, killing two more and injuring few others till a patron, James Shaw Jr., was able to wrestle the weapon away from the gunman. Continue reading

Losing a loved one during pregnancy may affect child’s mental health, finds study

Losing a loved one during pregnancy may affect child’s mental health, finds study

The grief related to the death of a loved one often remains at the back of one’s mind for a long time, and it can go on to affect one’s mental health. But for expectant mothers, the high stress level due to the death of a close relative may have an effect on the next generation, according to researchers from the Stanford University who tried to examine the impact of the loss on the mental health of a child in later stages of life. Continue reading