Virtual reality claims victim in real world – Popular vlogger Etika found dead in New York

Virtual reality claims victim in real world – Popular vlogger Etika found dead in New York

Desmond Amofah, 29, popularly known by his virtual name Etika, was missing for 6 days when his body was recovered by the New York Police Department (NYPD) on June 24, 2019. The police found his body in the East River on the South Street Seaport around 6:20 p.m. The NYPD informed the world about his death through their Tweet on June 25. According to the latest reports, a medical examiner will be performing an autopsy to determine his cause of death. Continue reading

PTSD Awareness Month – Tips to deal with PTSD symptoms

PTSD Awareness Month – Tips to deal with PTSD symptoms

Post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD is a mental health disorder that manifests in some individuals after they have experienced an unsafe, terrifying, or traumatic incident. Though it is normal to feel frightened and distraught after witnessing a disturbing incident, there are some people who continue to experience these symptoms even when they are out of danger who might be struggling with PTSD. The symptoms of PTSD usually become apparent within three months of the traumatic event, however, it might take many more months or even a year after the incident for the symptoms to manifest. While some people may recover within six months, in others, the condition might become chronic. Continue reading

International Fathers’ Mental Health Day: Is my daddy strongest?

International Fathers’ Mental Health Day: Is my daddy strongest?

PPD in men more common than perceived

The birth of a child can produce an array of emotions ranging from joy, happiness, and excitement to nervousness, anxiety, and fear. It is well known that new parents, especially the mothers, suffer from mood swings, disturbed sleeping patterns, and hormonal changes. Usually, the mothers are able to cope with these emotions, however, in some cases, these may lead to a long-lasting, severe form of depression known as post-partum depression (PPD). Continue reading

Workplace “burnout” declared occupational phenomenon by WHO

Workplace “burnout” declared occupational phenomenon by WHO

Accepting the challenges of stress stemming from work, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recognized workplace ‘burnout’ as an occupation phenomenon. According to a recent announcement made by the group, the definition of burnout is being revised in its latest version of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) – 11, the global handbook of disease, which would be implemented from January 2022. Continue reading

Why men avoid discussing suicide with their physicians?

Why men avoid discussing suicide with their physicians?

One of the primary reasons behind why older men hesitate in discussing suicidal tendencies with their physicians was the fear of psychiatric hospitalization, revealed a recent prelaunch assessment of a multimedia program called Men and Providers Preventing Suicide (MAPS). The multimedia program was aimed at encouraging older men to openly talk about suicidal tendencies or thoughts with their primary care providers and was lined to be integrated into the waiting areas of physicians across health systems. Continue reading

Millennial women more worried about their mental health than heart health

Millennial women more worried about their mental health than heart health

Millennial women worry more about their mental health, in comparison to their heart health, revealed a recently released report by the American Heart Association (AMA). Despite being the foremost cause of death in women, the AMA discovered that more than 75 percent of the young women were not much concerned about developing a heart disorder. This is because these women were more worried about other health concerns and the impact of heart health or how women were affected by heart health was not reaching them. Continue reading

Study links elevated anxiety, depression, and ADD to hyperhidrosis

Study links elevated anxiety, depression, and ADD to hyperhidrosis

Patients struggling with hyperhidrosis, a disorder causing excessive sweating, may increase one’s propensity to develop anxiety, depression or attention deficit disorder (ADD), revealed a recent publication presented at the 2019 yearly meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). Lead study investigator Dee Anna Glaser, MD, said that the psychological challenges faced by her patients initiated this study. Continue reading

Ensuring mental health well-being at workplace

Ensuring mental health well-being at workplace

Workplace stress is common and a serious problem as it might to lead anxiety, depression and many other mental health problems. Untreated mental health problems can lead to adverse health consequences like loss of productivity at work, relationship problems, and violent behavior among others. People often neglect their mental health and pay more attention to their physical health. Nonetheless, it is important to make mental well-being a priority so that one has a fulfilling career. Continue reading

WTC cleanup staff battling PTSD more vulnerable to heart problems, say researchers

WTC cleanup staff battling PTSD more vulnerable to heart problems, say researchers

The terror attack on New York City’s World Trade Center (WTC) complex on Sept. 11, 2001 continues to cause mental problems to New Yorkers. Even more than 16 years after the completion of the cleanup operations at the site of the tragedy, a study suggests that many members of the cleanup crew still grapple with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that may have increased their vulnerability to stroke and heart attack. Continue reading

Mental health education becomes mandatory in Virginia and New York schools

Mental health education becomes mandatory in Virginia and New York schools

New York and Virginia are the first states in the United States to make new laws that mandate schools to include mental health education in their curriculums. Recently, the New York legislation directed all K-12 classrooms to include compulsory mental health instruction as part of the overall health curriculum. “By ensuring that young people learn about mental health, we increase the likelihood that they will be able to more effectively recognize signs in themselves and others, including family members, and get the right help,” says the New York law. In Virginia, the new law will come into force this fall, making it obligatory for high school students to study about mental health during their first two years. Continue reading