Advanced paternal age adds to risk of early-onset of schizophrenia in children

Advanced paternal age adds to risk of early-onset of schizophrenia in children

Previous studies have linked advanced paternal age with an increased risk of schizophrenia onset in children, however, it has been challenging to differentiate the effects of factors related to age versus the effects of age. The paternal age association could be unauthentic if late fatherhood was held responsible for the early onset on schizophrenia because this also reflected the father’s own susceptibility to schizophrenia. Continue reading

Children growing up in cities without pets more likely to develop mental illness, says study

Children growing up in cities without pets more likely to develop mental illness, says study

People who live in the countryside with pets are more resilient to stress and mental health problems compared to people who lead a pet-free life in cities, suggests a recent study by researchers from the University of Ulm in Germany and the University of Colorado (CU) Boulder. The researchers attributed the overall well-being of countryside people to their efficient immune systems due to the exposure to animals and bacteria-laden dust. Continue reading

Man dies in custody after taunted by cops for faking mental illness and denied treatment

Man dies in custody after taunted by cops for faking mental illness and denied treatment

The latest video footage shared by the Cleveland County jail and Cleveland County Sheriff’s Department in Oklahoma shows the callousness of police officers toward a man suffering from mental illness who later died in custody. As per police records, on Jan. 16, 2018, Marconia Kessee (35) was arrested by Master Police Officer Kyle Canaan and Officer Daniel Brown for trespassing at Norman Regional Hospital. According to the officers, Kessee was arrested on grounds of his refusal to leave the hospital post his treatment. Found to be medically fit for incarceration by the doctors, Kessee, however, died two hours later in a cell at the F. DeWayne Beggs Detention Center. Continue reading

No more solitary confinement for Ontario’s prisoners with mental illness

No more solitary confinement for Ontario’s prisoners with mental illness

The Government of Ontario in Canada and the Human Rights Commission of the province have signed an agreement to discontinue the practice of placing inmates with mental illnesses in solitary confinement, except under exceptional circumstances. The process of tracking and gradually ending the practice will begin with immediate effect. The accord order, issued by the Ontario’s Human Rights Tribunal, will apply to all 26 correctional facilities across the province. Continue reading

Is Blue Monday real? Here’s how to make Mondays happier

Is Blue Monday real? Here’s how to make Mondays happier

With fading memories of the last Christmas celebrations, weight gain due to binge eating (and drinking in many cases), return to work, and dwindling bank accounts, life might appear to be bleak for a lot of people. While every day might seem like an uphill task, Mondays especially turn out to be difficult. And if it’s a third Monday of January, chances are that even a headstrong person may feel the blues. For, the third Monday of January is notorious as Blue Monday – the gloomiest day of the year – in some parts of the world. Continue reading

World Smile Day: Are you smiling to immerse your depression?

World Smile Day: Are you smiling to immerse your depression?

The general assumption about a person smiling is that he or she is happy, relaxed and enjoying life. Nevertheless, according to the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI), an individual who appears to be happy and goes about his or her daily chores comfortably, but is still unable to enjoy life, might be suffering from smiling depression.

In simple words, smiling depression is a depressive disorder in which a person appears to be happy despite battling an inner turmoil. Characterized by atypical symptoms, smiling depression is hard to detect as people suffering from this disorder generally do well in their professional, social and personal lives. Continue reading

State of Mississippi spent more on institutionalizing than on community services for mentally ill, reveals report

State of Mississippi spent more on institutionalizing than on community services for mentally ill, reveals report

A recent report, authorized by the Mississippi Department of Mental Health (MSDMH), has revealed that a major share of the state’s resources was spent on institutionalizing those with mental disabilities rather than on community services for them. The same findings had previously been established by the U.S. Department of Justice. The report was made public Continue reading

How PTSD affects physical health

How PTSD affects physical health

“PTSD is a whole-body tragedy, an integral human event of enormous proportions with massive repercussions.” – Susan Pease Banitt                                                                        

Author, therapist and trauma expert, Susan Pease Banitt has rightly said that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that can have an incapacitating effect on a person’s mental and physical health. There is no greater anguish than being traumatized by a nerve-racking event, day and night, taking the serenity away from an individual’s life. Continue reading

US reeling under mental health crisis

US reeling under mental health crisis

Mental illnesses are a grave public health issue in the United States. Psychiatric conditions make an individual feel depressed and low on energy and also impact his/her functioning ability. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), in 2015, there were over 43 million people aged 18 years or older in the country – representing about 18 percent of the adult population — with any mental illness (AMI) within the previous year. Continue reading

PTSD Awareness Month: Computer-based attention control training can effectively treat PTSD, suggests study

PTSD Awareness Month: Computer-based attention control training can effectively treat PTSD, suggests study

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that affects an individual who has experienced a shocking, scary, or life-threatening event. Typically, the symptoms of the condition, such as flashbacks, bad dreams, scary thoughts, inability to sleep properly and anger outbursts, begin to develop within three months of the traumatic incident, but at times, they tend to appear years later. Continue reading